Art Media

Lego stop-motion: The Taming of the Shrew by William Shakespeare

Act I, Induction Scenes I and II

Christopher Sly, a local drunk, is mislead by a lord to believe that Sly is actually nobility. While passed out, Sly is carried to the castle where he is cleaned, dressed in fine clothing and placed in bed. When he wakes up, the fun begins!

Taming Of The Shrew

Act I, Induction Scenes I and II

Christopher Sly, a local drunk, is mislead by a lord to believe that Sly is actually nobility. While unconscious due to his intoxication, the Lord’s servants carry sly to the Lord’s castle.  He is cleaned, dressed in fine clothing and placed in bed. When he wakes up, the fun begins!

Shakespeare’s “The Taming of the Shrew”

Induction Scenes I and II

In the induction, we meet a drunk beggar named Christopher Sly, who is arguing with the Hostess of an Alehouse over glassware he has broken in his drunken state. Sly leaves but soon passes out, where he is discovered by a lord returning from the hunt. This lord decides to have a bout of fun and orders his servants to take Sly back to his house and treat him as if he were the lord: put him to bed, place rings on his fingers and prepare a banquet for him. The confusion that follows not only provides excellent comedy, but also introduces important topics in the play: the roles of class, gender, and marital status (normally set in stone) in the play become matters of appearance and perception.

Shakespeare’s “The Taming of the Shrew”

Induction Scenes I and II

In the induction, we meet a drunk beggar named Christopher Sly, who is arguing with the Hostess of an Alehouse over glassware he has broken in his drunken state. Sly leaves but soon passes out, where he is discovered by a lord returning from the hunt. This lord decides to have a bout of fun and orders his servants to take Sly back to his house and treat him as if he were the lord: put him to bed, place rings on his fingers and prepare a banquet for him. The confusion that follows not only provides excellent comedy, but also introduces important topics in the play: the roles of class, gender, and marital status (normally set in stone) in the play become matters of appearance and perception.

William Shakespeare’s “The Taming of the Shrew”

Induction Scenes I and II

In the induction, we meet a drunk beggar named Christopher Sly, who is arguing with the Hostess of an Alehouse over glassware he has broken in his drunken state. Sly leaves but soon passes out, where he is discovered by a lord returning from the hunt. This lord decides to have a bout of fun and orders his servants to take Sly back to his house and treat him as if he were the lord: put him to bed, place rings on his fingers and prepare a banquet for him. The confusion that follows not only provides excellent comedy, but also introduces important topics in the play: the roles of class, gender, and marital status (normally set in stone) in the play become matters of appearance and perception.

“The Taming of the Shrew” by William Shakespeare

Induction Scenes I and II

In the induction, we meet a drunk beggar named Christopher Sly, who is arguing with the Hostess of an Alehouse over glassware he has broken in his drunken state. Sly leaves but soon passes out, where he is discovered by a lord returning from the hunt. This lord decides to have a bout of fun and orders his servants to take Sly back to his house and treat him as if he were the lord: put him to bed, place rings on his fingers and prepare a banquet for him. The confusion that follows not only provides excellent comedy, but also introduces important topics in the play: the roles of class, gender, and marital status (normally set in stone) in the play become matters of appearance and perception.

William Shakespeare’s “The Taming of the Shrew”

Induction Scenes I and II

In the induction, we meet a drunk beggar named Christopher Sly, who is arguing with the Hostess of an Alehouse over glassware he has broken in his drunken state. Sly leaves but soon passes out, where he is discovered by a lord returning from the hunt. This lord decides to have a bout of fun and orders his servants to take Sly back to his house and treat him as if he were the lord: put him to bed, place rings on his fingers and prepare a banquet for him. The confusion that follows not only provides excellent comedy, but also introduces important topics in the play: the roles of class, gender, and marital status (normally set in stone) in the play become matters of appearance and perception.